DIY: How to make a Christmas tea cup posy

How to make a christmas posy

I’ve always fancied doing floristry, I think it’s the homemaker side of me coming out. When I was a child I would pick wild flowers on country walks to take home and put in a vase, and now that I’m older I love to have fresh flowers in my house. I’ve always thought the idea of owning a florist, spending days surrounded by roses and lilies, would be such a great job, but for now I’ll stick to my yearly dabble in floristry – making my own festive floral display!

This tea cup posy is something a little different and a project anyone can try. It’s made using a variety of winter branches that can be collected from the forest, and can be made in a teacup – best to start small if you are a beginner like me! A poinsettia forms the focal point and some pussy willow branches, a white rose and a padded star pick add that festive feel. This tea cup is actually a large decorative container, but the design would work in miniature in a standard sized tea cup or even a bigger container too – whatever fits in the centre of your Christmas dinner table!

What you will need:

A tea cup container
1x block of floral foam
Handful of pine, spruce or fir tree branches
1x stem of thistle (with multiple flower heads per stem)
1x white rose
1x stem of wax flower (with multiple flower heads per stem)
1x cream poinsettia plant
1 decorative festive pick (padded star)
2 x stems of pussy willow
(Increase amount of flowers if using a bigger container)
Sharp knife
Secateurs

How to make a Christmas posy:

1) Soak a standard-sized block of floral foam in a bucket of water. Leave the foam soaking until it has naturally sunk in the water – never forcefully push it down.

2) Once the foam has absorbed plenty of water, use a sharp knife to slice it into a block that is narrow enough to fit inside your teacup and tall enough so that it’s a couple of centimetres higher than the rim of the cup. It’s also a good idea to slice the sharp edges and corners away from the top of the foam.

3) Next, take your festive foliage – be it pine, spruce or something similar – and cut it into individual branches around 20-30cm long. You’ll probably need secateurs to be able to do this! Strip the needles away from the ends of each branch so that you have about 5cm of bare branch to insert into the foam.

4) Make a rim of foliage around the base of the design by pushing the branches into the foam.

How to make a christmas posy

5) Cut a poinsettia bract (flower) from the plant. You’ll notice that inside the plant is a milky liquid. In order to keep the liquid from seeping out and to ensure the leaves stay fresh for as long as possible, dip the cut end in 60+° water for five seconds, and then dip immediately in cold water. Now you can insert it into the top of the foam block.

6) Next, add more flowers! Cut and strip each stem leaving around 10cm from the head, and insert into the foam. Here a thistle and wax flower have been used.

How to make a christmas posy

7) Add a white rose to the cup, blowing gently into the flower to puff out and separate the petals.

How to make a christmas posy

8) To finish, take two stems of pussy willow and loop them across the design, pushing both ends of each stem into the foam to secure. Then add a festive pick – this star-shaped pick is really cute!

How to make a christmas posy

I hope this has inspired you to have a go at a bit of floristry. This Christmas, make sure you buy a poinsettia plant large enough to sacrifice a few stems to make this tea cup posy!

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7 thoughts on “DIY: How to make a Christmas tea cup posy

  1. Lovely arrangement, you could also add a few cinnamon sticks tied with raffia (cut into small lengths), or pine cones. A good idea also is a candle in the centre.
    Sorry ! Iam a florist so giving other ideas for arrangements comes naturally.
    Any way you have inspired me to do a blog post about xmas decorations, thank you…………Mags x

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